The space-faring descendant of the Willys Jeep - The Warthog

Words: Scott Blackburn Artwork: Kai Lim & Adam Burn (via Halopedia)

Kai Lim

Kai Lim

So you know how the year is definitely 2559 and not 2018? Well you do now. Way back in the 1940s the Americans stuck on the ideal design for an off-road, military vehicle, the Willys Jeep. Now, in 2559, its descendant is still in use and still going strong as the core light transport of the United Nations Space Command. This massively evolved Jeep is the Warthog, or the M12 Force Application Vehicle if you want to be pedantic, designed by AMG Transport Dynamics.

Power is derived from a hydrogen injected ICE engine unit mounted in the front and low down for a good centre of gravity. These have been the standard engines used by the UNSC since traditional internal combustion was outmoded some 400 years before, surely everyone remembers the great hydrogen revolution of 1919? Not only is this method no longer dependant on fossil fuels Warthogs these days also come fitted with Gaf/Hauptman solar/saline actuators. This handy little addition allows the Warthog to extract the vital hydrogen from any kind of water on the go, the first potentially piss-powered cars.

Kai Lim

Kai Lim

The outer space Jeep is also AWD and features all-wheel-steering which allows for an incredible turning circle, made even better with masterful use of the hand-brake. On the subject of masterful however the Warthog has a reputation for being a little tricky to get the hang of but brilliantly useful once you have. The UNSC's workhorse has been in use since 2319 and comes in a myriad of different adaptations from weapons transport to ambulance.

In order to ensure soldiers can quickly leave the vehicle and not watch it disappear off a cliff, the Warthog is fitted with huge brake discs and an automatic braking system, allowing for near immediate braking once the user leaves. Just in front of the giant brakes you'll notice the proportionally huge tyres, which aren't actually tyres. Instead they're composed of nano-tubes to make a near indestructible single unit with similar buoyancy as conventional tyres.

Adam Burn

Adam Burn

Depending on the variant however the Warthog only seats two - three people and is prone to rolling, which might put a bit of a damper on your day. Despite these drawbacks though the M12 has been in use for some 200 years and is still going strong, a worthy descendant to the Willys Jeep and really good fun to chuck about some distant world, once you've got the hang of it.