The World’s Largest Production Motorcycle Engine - The New Triumph Rocket

Words: Scott Blackburn

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Originally launched in 2004, the Triumph Rocket III was a testament to what can be achieved when you take an engine big enough for a sedan and strap it to a motorcycle. The answer is fast, and loud, and big …. and kind of tempting, in the same way as trying to Dukes-of-Hazard your hatchback over a hill is, probably fun but also very obviously potentially dangerous. 

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This reworked 2,500 cc three cylinder engine makes 165 bhp on a bike that is 40% lighter than its predecessor. The comforting here though, that sets the rocket apart from a maniac who took the engine out of his sedan and put wheels on it, is the amount of effort Triumph have put into making that power manageable for normal people. 

With heavy-duty Brembo brakes and adjustable Showa suspension, the Rocket III R and GT come loaded with a suite of power and comfort-management tech. This varies depending on whether you go with the sporty R or distance-orientated GT, but accurate handling and commanding ride position are features that run through the whole model. 

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Triumph have developed an all-new six-speed gearbox accompanied by a new ‘torque assist’ clutch to help riders handle the 2.5 L monster they’ve strapped to the Rocket. Visually, the new Rocket makes no attempts to hide what it is, making an imposing stance with equally monstrous exhausts. 

No doubt the gaping pipes come with a suitable soundtrack too. If you’re brave and/or mad enough to consider the new Rocket, the prices have not been announced as of yet but are likely to be in the £20,000-ish region, with machines hitting dealers this December. 

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